Classroom Activities

Here are some activities that you can use in lessons that address problem gambling. They were created or adapted by Rosemarie Bonner, part of our original Beat Addiction Training of the Trainers Cadre. She is the Supervisor for Health and Physical Education for West Hartford Public Schools.

If you would like to share your experiences with these activities or add others, please do so on the Comments and Questions page under Sharing.

1. Carousel Brainstorm: Carousel Brainstorming allows participants to share ideas and build a set of common questions and assumptions before they begin to read or view any material to be presented.


2. Word Splash - A Word Splash writing activity asks students to craft meaningful sentences that use vocabulary from academic content. See following link for information on how to use a Word Splash activity. (http://www.writingfix.com/PDFs/Comparison_Contrast/Comp_Cont_Word_Splashes.pdf). The specific words related to gambling are found in the following PowerPoint slide.


3. 3-2-1 Check - Check is an activity to use at the end of a class. It has the students identify three things that they learned during a class (related to gambling and addiction), two things that they liked about the class, and one thing that would change about the class. It is an activity that can be used with different content.


4. Entrance-Exit Slip - An Entrance-Exit Slip activity can be used before and after a class or discussion to check for comprehension.


5. K-W-L Chart - A K-W-L Chart can be used at the beginning of a lesson to find out what the students know and what they want to know. At the end of a class or discussion, they review what they have learned.


6. Reading-Text Connection - Reading-Text Connection can be used with a reading passage that references youth and gambling issues.


7. Anticipation Guide - An Anticipation Guide is a worksheet that the students can complete prior to watching the Beat Addiction DVD and then after watching it. They can then compare the differences in their responses.